Black hero of the day: DJ Kool Herc

By: Akim Hudson 

Black History Month has been revered as a month long emblazon for the black masses. Although it is the shortest month of the year, everyday we celebrate, reflect, and express gratitude for the royalty that we are predecessors of. Within this month, I will fulfill the obligation of educating St. Bonaventure on the legendary black revolutionaries that isn’t  taught in the United States’ “education” system. Peace, God, I hope you enjoy your 29 days of enlightenment, beloved.

“I said a hip hop the hippie the hippie To the hip hip hop and you don’t stop The rock it to the bang bang boogie Say up jump the boogie to the rhythm of the boogie, the beat”, classic, historical, and iconic hook by Wonder Mike of the Sugarhill Gang. Hip-Hop, more than music, it is the culture. The concept of hip-hop music has been around approximately forty three years, and has yet to decelerate. The current state of hip-hop has fallen off in the facet of quality, but has reached its zenith as far as popularity goes. Hip-hop is the most popular genre in music, and the man who is credited for creating it, DJ Kool Herc. DJ Kool Herc is a Jamaican-American man who created hip-hop in the South Bronx, NY. The first to create “the break” on a turntable that rocked block parties for b-boys to dance to. Soon, other DJs would learn to scratch, mix, and sample like Herc. Without Herc, we wouldn’t have been blessed with all the culture that hip-hip has brought to the United States and the world (and sense I’m Jamaican, this makes this article that much sweeter).

Black hero of the day: Huey P. Newton

By: Akim Hudson

Black History Month has been revered as a month long emblazon for the black masses. Although it is the shortest month of the year, everyday we celebrate, reflect, and express gratitude for the royalty that we are predecessors of. Within this month, I will fulfill the obligation of educating St. Bonaventure on the legendary black revolutionaries that isn’t  taught in the United States’ “education” system. Peace, God, I hope you enjoy your 29 days of enlightenment, beloved.

After Malcolm X and Dr. King were both murdered, the black community’s patience and tranquility had exceeded its limits. There was a need for something or someone that the black community could turn to, and The Black Panthers rose to the occasion. Huey P. Newton was the co-creator of this coalition, along with Bobby Seale. While at college, the two met each other and formed the panthers to combat the police brutality and racial discrimination that was prominent in Oakland, California. By the late 60’s, The Black Panther Party rose to its utmost prominence. Gaining affiliation from Stokely Carmichael, H. Rap Brown, Angela Davis, Bobby Seale, Fred Hampton, Assata Shakur, Mumia Abu-Jamal, Pete O’Neal, and many others. Together they created a wave of black existentialism and reform. Newton was quite the samaritan, providing the black community in Oakland with food, and other necessities.

Newton has had many run-ins with the law, none more important than his incarceration in 1967 for an alleged murder of an Oakland police officer. While serving his voluntary manslaughter charge, “Free Huey” became a popular chant and the many rallies along with the chant heavily influenced his early release in 1970. After being charged for murder in 1974, Newton fled to Cuba. Ultimately I believe the federal government played a role in his demise, but Newton suffered from alcoholism, drug addiction, and poverty before his death in 1989. The feds attempted to paint a bad image of Newton, but in the black community, he will always be a hero and a revolutionary. Peace and prosperity, beloved.

Black hero of the day: Patricia Hill-Collins

By: Akim Hudson

Black History Month has been revered as a month long emblazon for the black masses. Although it is the shortest month of the year, everyday we celebrate, reflect, and express gratitude for the royalty that we are predecessors of. Within this month, I will fulfill the obligation of educating St. Bonaventure on the legendary black revolutionaries that isn’t  taught in the United States’ “education” system. Peace, God, I hope you enjoy your 29 days of enlightenment, beloved.

Influenced by the great black feminist before her such as Alice Walker, Angela Davis, and Audre Lorde; Collins specializes in inequities of race, class, and gender. Currently a professor of Sociology at the University of Maryland, College Park. Collins served as the 100th President of the American Sociological Association in 2009. She broke out with her monumental article, “Learning from the Outsider Within” in 1989, and Hill-Collins would continue to captivate the minds with her book Black Feminist Thought: Knowledge, Consciousness, and the Politics of Empowerment. With an array of books that exhibit the inequity of black women in the United States, Hill-Collins garnered her success. As always, I am grateful to have to opportunity to educate others about these great black revolutionaries. Peace and prosperity, beloved.

Black hero of the day:Gloria Jean Watkins

Black History Month has been revered as a month long emblazon for the black masses. Although it is the shortest month of the year, everyday we celebrate, reflect, and express gratitude for the royalty that we are predecessors of. Within this month, I will fulfill the obligation of educating St. Bonaventure on the legendary black revolutionaries that isn’t  taught in the United States’ “education” system. Peace, God, I hope you enjoy your 29 days of enlightenment, beloved.
Gloria Jean Watkins aka “Bell Hooks”, is an author, feminist, professor, and social activist. Though Watkins grew up in an impoverished area, and attended racially segregated schools of Hopkinsville, Kentucky; she naturally gravitated towards literature. Her great grandmother, Bell Hooks, perhaps was the most influential person in Watkins life. Hooks was a fairly candid observer, which bolstered her meticulous effort towards writing. Watkins main motivation to write her first book was the lack of attention and interest white women scholars gave her work and the gender issues by black scholars. Thus, resulting in the release of Ain’t I a Woman : Black Women and Feminism (1981), Watkins’ insightful first major book elaborated on the concept of intersectionality. Intersectionality is a concept that conjugates gender, race, social class, and so forth; and how this motley is societal distinctions impact the life of oneself. Her debut book was centric to the life of a black woman in the United States. In 1989, Watkins published Talking Back: Thinking Feminist, Thinking Black. Which particularly focused on the white imperialism and patriarchal oppression. Watkins is one of many black feminists who has made their mark on black history. It is an honor to be able to educate you on “Bell Hooks”.
Peace and prosperity, beloved.

Black hero of the day: Dr. Amos N. Wilson

By: Akim Hudson 

Black History Month has been revered as a month long emblazon for the black masses. Although it is the shortest month of the year, everyday we celebrate, reflect, and express gratitude for the royalty that we are predecessors of. Within this month, I will fulfill the obligation of educating St. Bonaventure on the legendary black revolutionaries that isn’t deified or taught in the United States’ “education” system. Peace, God, I hope you enjoy your 29 days of enlightenment, beloved.

Dr. Amos N. Wilson was a psychologist, sociologist, and Pan-Africanist who contributed to the proposition that the distinctions between blacks and white was the main catalyst of racism, not only in the United States, but globally. Thus, his belief in Pan-Africanism. After earning his undergraduate from the legendary HBCU, Morehouse College in Atlanta, Georgia; Wilson made his strides to New York City where he’d attain his Ph.D. from Fordham University. Brother Wilson’s most memorable piece of work, The Powerless Powerful Black Falsified Consciousness, renders how blacks’ have vast and immensely powerful minds, yet lack the power to spark an upheaval. The Powerless Powerful Black Falsified Consciousness divulges “we’re unconscious of the power that’s in our hands”; rather prophetic because blacks still aren’t aware of how powerful they truly are. Dr. Wilson is no longer with us, and his legacy is rather esoteric to the masses who are passionate of black studies. Though he died in 1995, I am delighted to have the opportunity to educate the audience on his greatness. Peace and prosperity, beloved.

Black hero of the day: Stokely Carmichael

Black History Month has been revered as a month long emblazon for the black masses. Although it is the shortest month of the year, everyday we celebrate, reflect, and express gratitude for the royalty that we are predecessors of. Within this month, I will fulfill the obligation of educating St. Bonaventure on the legendary black revolutionaries that isn’t  taught in the United States’ “education” system. Peace, God, I hope you enjoy your 29 days of enlightenment, beloved.
Kwame Ture aka Stokely Carmichael was a renowned flamboyant organizer amid the Civil Rights, and Pan-Africanism movement. He began his future of being a revolutionary leader while attending Howard University. He witnessed college students in Greensboro, North Carolina perform the monumental “sit-in” at the Whites only lunch counter. In June of 1966, Carmichael began his own movement. Carmichael created the iconic phrase “Black Power” during a rally in Mississippi. This phrase became iconic because it praised empowerment to the black community in the sense of enlightenment. One of the early black existentialist, likewise to the concepts of Booker T. Washington, and Marcus Garvey. Carmichael preached self help to the black community, meaning everything must be black owned. Black businesses, black industry, and so on and so forth. Carmichael also preached re-tribalism, his point was the black community was being destroyed by the turmoil caused by racial oppression. He himself would go back to Africa, making annual trips back to the United States. Later he served as the Honorary Prime Minister of The Black Panthers. Ture was a true revolutionary and a personal top-five favorite black revolutionary. Although he is no longer with us, and many don’t know of his legacy, his ability to conform the masses will never be undermined. Peace, God.

Welch looks to take the next step

By: Isaiah Blakely 

Dominick Welch had a slow start to his freshman year but found his groove in the second half of the year, and he looks to build on that this season.

Welch averaged 7.5 points per game and 4.4 rebounds in 25 games last season. Welch missed a chunk of the season with a foot injury. Welch’s first seven games he was only averaging 5 points and 2.6 rebounds a game, but his last 18 games he was averaging 8.4 points a game and 5.1 rebounds including in the Atlantic 10 tournament where the Buffalo native averaged 12 points 7 rebounds and 2.3 blocks over the three games.

Welch led the team with 43 three pointers made and shot 36 percent from three. Head coach Mark Schmidt wants Welch to continue to develop on the offensive end.

“He’s made unbelievable strides…at times he was our best guy. But he has to take that next step,” said Schmidt. “All he could do was catch and shoot. Now he’s got to take guys off the bounce. His dribble has got to tighten up.”

Welch said that the biggest thing he was looking to add to his game was tighten up his handle as well as improve his overall game. A player Welch likes watching is Los Angeles Clippers star Paul George because he is an all-around two-way player.

Schmidt had high praise for Welch as an overall player already.

“He’s smart. In my 30 years of coaching he’s probably in the top 5 of guys I underestimated,” said Schmidt. “He has a really good feel offensively and defensively. He’s got a lot of pride, and when he doesn’t play well it really affects him and he works at it.”

Schmidt says he’ll be playing multiple positions including the power forward spot when the team plays small ball this year. “We’re expecting him to take that next step and become a really good player,” said Schmidt.

Welch talked about keeping his confidence up through the ups and downs in a season.

“Keeping my confidence,and my confidence is back right now. It was a tough loss last year. But we’re trying to keep that momentum that we have in last year over to this season,” said Welch. “Bring the young guys with us and make sure they have confidence going out there with us.”

Welch mentioned that tough loss in the Atlantic 10 championship to St. Louis, but the goal for this team is to get back to that game.

“Our team goals are to try to get back to the Atlantic 10 championship,” said Welch. “Just try to take it game by game and work hard every day.”

Welch knows the freshmen on this team are going to be important and they need to stay ready.

“There’s spots open every day. It makes you work hard,” said Welch. “We were freshmen coming in playing 40 minutes a game. The opportunities there, we lost two players last year, so the minutes are there.”

Welch begins to help lead the Bonnies tonight at 7:30 against Ohio in the Reilly Center.

Oliver looks to make every second count

By: Isaiah Blakely 

Amanda Oliver is in her second season with the Bonnies and this season she was voted as a captain. She’s looking to end her career with no regrets.

The Orlando, Florida native averaged 2.7 points and 4.8 rebounds in 29 games including 15 starts last season, but in Bonnies head coach Jesse Fleming’s eyes Oliver was always meant to be a captain.

“I thought when we recruited her that was a big part of what we recruited Amanda for,” said Fleming. “Amanda was about the intangibles Amanda is going to win every loose ball, she’s going to be competitive, she’s going to play hard all the time and that’s why she’s a leader for us.”

Before Oliver arrived at St. Bonaventure, she was a two-time all-conference selection while playing at Florida Southwestern State College. She averaged a team leading 8.4 rebounds her sophomore year.

Oliver has a knack for rebounding and making the hustle plays the Bonnies need, but Oliver said she’s looking to take her game to another level.

“I perfected my jumper and just take my hustle game to the next level and defensive level,” said Oliver.

Coach Fleming wants her to be more effective offensively.

“I want her to be able to score against mismatches in the post,” said Fleming.

The senior says it feels like she has been here for years and has fully embraced what she calls the “Bonnie craze”.

“I feel like I’ve been here for years….Coming in I was taught from the seniors above me, and you just play every game like it’s your last,” said Oliver. “Show that passion that is being a Bonaventure student and a Bonnie.”

Off the court Oliver is a part of campus media. She has had a video series called ‘Around the RC with Amanda Oliver’, and she is a reporter for SBU-TV.

“It’s been a challenge…I never thought I’d done that…It’s been an awesome experience I’ll take with me throughout my life,” said Oliver.

Oliver kicks off her final season Tuesday night against St. Johns at 5 p.m. in the Reilly Center.