Black hero of the day: Stokely Carmichael

Black History Month has been revered as a month long emblazon for the black masses. Although it is the shortest month of the year, everyday we celebrate, reflect, and express gratitude for the royalty that we are predecessors of. Within this month, I will fulfill the obligation of educating St. Bonaventure on the legendary black revolutionaries that isn’t  taught in the United States’ “education” system. Peace, God, I hope you enjoy your 29 days of enlightenment, beloved.
Kwame Ture aka Stokely Carmichael was a renowned flamboyant organizer amid the Civil Rights, and Pan-Africanism movement. He began his future of being a revolutionary leader while attending Howard University. He witnessed college students in Greensboro, North Carolina perform the monumental “sit-in” at the Whites only lunch counter. In June of 1966, Carmichael began his own movement. Carmichael created the iconic phrase “Black Power” during a rally in Mississippi. This phrase became iconic because it praised empowerment to the black community in the sense of enlightenment. One of the early black existentialist, likewise to the concepts of Booker T. Washington, and Marcus Garvey. Carmichael preached self help to the black community, meaning everything must be black owned. Black businesses, black industry, and so on and so forth. Carmichael also preached re-tribalism, his point was the black community was being destroyed by the turmoil caused by racial oppression. He himself would go back to Africa, making annual trips back to the United States. Later he served as the Honorary Prime Minister of The Black Panthers. Ture was a true revolutionary and a personal top-five favorite black revolutionary. Although he is no longer with us, and many don’t know of his legacy, his ability to conform the masses will never be undermined. Peace, God.