Appropriateness is subjective under First Amendment 

[Photo courtesy of Chicago-Sun Times]

By Marshall Myers

Divisive, polarizing and controversial are all words used to describe the current state of social issues in our country. I know what you’re thinking, “Oh no, not another Donald Trump article! We can’t keep up as it is.”

However, this piece is not about our president’s voracious tweeting habits, or the always present dramas that seem to follow him everywhere.  Rather, where does our First Amendment right to free speech end, and can someone take this expression too far?

But first, a look into some recent events.  About three weeks ago, a well-known and liked ESPN host, Jemele Hill, took to twitter to voice her opinions on our current president. Using terms like “white supremacist,” “ignorant,” and “bigot,” her tweets gained notoriety very quickly.

Continue reading “Appropriateness is subjective under First Amendment “

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Banks-Palin fiasco calls for racial dialogue

[image courtesy of rollingstone.com]

By: Liam McGurl  @Liiiammm1996

 

Rapper Azealia Banks is most commonly known for her foul mouth, which she has excused by calling her verbal daggers a part of her “crass, New-York-City sense of humor.”  I’d have some serious questions for anyone who would accept such a poor excuse for vulgarities; regardless, it is likely Banks supporters would agree the 24-year-old rapper’s taken things a bit too far this time.

After a March 31 Newslo article’s release, jokingly telling that former Alaskan governor Sarah Palin said blacks “accepted [slavery] willingly,” Banks took to Twitter, voicing her thoughts on the statement.

Unfortunately for Palin, Banks’ comments were nothing short of humiliating.  Even worse for Banks, the comedy-based article was falsified.  That’s right, Palin never made the remarks in the first place, despite Banks’ all-too-real comebacks.

Continue reading “Banks-Palin fiasco calls for racial dialogue”

Click the arrow at the picture’s bottom-right corner to see the enlarged graphic

Using the Twitter feed to measure what the St. Bonaventure community talks about is one way The Intrepid will integrate social media with news reporting.

The “Best St. Bonaventure tweets” graphic will award points to the top five, 10 or 15 tweeters, depending on the volume of tweets. The point winner will receive a prize at the end of May.

The first-place prize is to be determined but around $50 in value. Second and third will also receive a prize, value to be determined.

The first-place tweeter receives 10 points, second place eight, third place six, fourth place four and fifth place two. Sixth place and below receives one point.

The rankings will be selected by The Intrepid’s staff.

Any user following The Intrepid’s Twitter (@Intrepid_SBU) at the moment of tweeting receives 20 points automatically. Any tweets selected as a top five, 10 or 15 with #TheIntrepid hashtag will get another 10 points.

The topics for this graphic will vary, ranging from the worst Hickey Dinning Hall experience to the best professor to learn from on campus. Almuni tweeting about fondest Bona memories or random St. Bonaventure-related thoughts may have a chance to win, too.

Sometimes The Intrepid will ask its followers to ask questions. A “Best St. Bonaventure tweet” graphic could be created from that, too.

The best way for The Intrepid and its staff to track your tweets would be to use #TheIntrepid or CC @Intrepid_SBU in your tweets. If you tweet without those, our staff will try its best to enter them into our database.

However, if you do not want The Intrepid to use your tweets, please do not hesitate to send us an e-mail at editors@theintrepid.org, direct messaging on Twitter or put a #DQ (as in don’t quote) at the end of your tweets.

The Intrepid will always ask the private Twitter accounts before using one of its tweets.

The Intrepid will respect a certain tweeter’s preference without judgment.